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NOVEMBER 5th + 20 = 25th When The Parliamentary VOTE ON BREXIT GOES POP FOR MAY

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Brexit deal: When are parliament due to vote on Theresa May’s Brexit deal?

 

 

THERESA May has struck the first draft of a Brexit deal with the EU but she has a mountain to climb before it’s written into law. So when could parliament vote?

 

PUBLISHED: 13:13, Wed, Nov 21, 2018 | UPDATED: 13:14, Wed, Nov 21, 2018

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The UK will meet with the EU in the coming to finalise the agreement before Theresa May’s Brexit deal can be put to the House of Commons.

 

Parliament will then vote on two things: Firstly, on the terms of the divorce, or “exit deal,” and secondly on the future UK-EU relationship, or “new deal.”

 

Both deals need to pass parliament to become law.

When is parliament due to vote?

 

Before the UK parliament can vote, Theresa May needs to get the deal passed by the 27 EU member states.

 

The Prime Minister will be hoping to achieve this on November 25, when she attends an emergency EU summit in Brussels for that express purpose.

 

READ MORE: What does the draft Brexit deal say? The key points you need to know 

Brexit deal

Brexit deal: Before the UK parliament can vote, Theresa May needs to get the deal passed by the EU27 (Image: Getty)

 

All going well, if the EU27 pass the draft, it’ll be time for parliament to vote.

 

The date will be set then, but it’s very likely to take place fairly soon afterwards: Brexit is due to commence on March 29, 2019, so the clock is ticking.

 

BBC’s political editor, Laura Kuenssberg, said the vote could take place around December 7.

 

 

READ MORE: Who has written letters of NO CONFIDENCE in Theresa May? 

Brexit deal

Brexit deal: Theresa May needs 320 votes in the House of Commons to get the deal approved. (Image: Getty)

 

Can May get the deal through Commons?

 

Theresa May needs 320 votes in the House of Commons to get the deal approved.

 

With 315 Tories in the House, you might think this isn’t too much of a challenge.

 

But you’d be wrong – Mrs May is facing fierce criticism from all sides, including within her party.

 

And crucially, Mrs May needs the Northern Irish DUP to vote for the deal, and they have said they won’t.

 

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Added to that, some 51 Conservative MPs have signed up to the StandUp4Brexit campaign which argues that the proposed deal leaves the UK too close to the EU.

 

Added to those are the seven pro-Brexit MPs who resigned from government or party jobs on 15 November.

 

Then there are some 14 Conservative MPs from the Remain wing of the party who support the People’s Vote campaign for another referendum or would like a closer relationship with the EU.

 

READ MORE: Could we still have no-deal Brexit? What does that mean?

Brexit deal

Brexit deal: All the MPs who have confirmed submitting a letter of no-confident in the PM (Image: PA)

 

On the other side of the calculation, there are a handful of pro-Brexit Labour MPs who might back the deal.

 

And a further group who could vote for it to stop the possible alternative of a “no deal” Brexit.

There’s also one Liberal Democrat MP, Stephen Lloyd, who says he’ll vote in favour of the deal to fulfil a pledge he made to his constituents.

 

As things stand, though, this group isn’t big enough to outweigh the DUP and Conservative rebels.

 

Things can change of course. Mrs May will hope to persuade some of the rebels and more opposition MPs. But she has a long way to go.

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